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Condoms – It’s so Hard to Imagine the Contemporary World without them

Condoms have become an integral part of sexual life in today’s world. In fact, condoms are available in almost every corner of the world with the exception of a few areas such as Anambra State in Nigeria. Encouraging the use of condoms in Anambra State is illegal. Given its widespread use in nearly all societies, it is hard to imagine that researchers invented the latex rubber condom as recently as 1920.

However, people used condoms made of various materials before this invention. For example, condoms made of intestines, bladder, and linen during the Renaissance Period (the 1300s to 1600s) were common.condom-types During the Medieval Period, some men soaked their penis in onion juice or covered it in tar before they had sexual intercourse. They thought doing so would help them prevent contraception from taking place.

Latex condoms are now the most popular. However, there are also other kinds that are also quite popular today.

A bit of statistics on condoms use in the world

The number of condoms sold worldwide amounts to 5 billion condoms each year. The Chinese are the heaviest users of this commodity in the world followed by the British. The US ranks as the sixth highest consumer of condoms in the world. Men purchase 70% of all the condoms in the US with an average pack of 12 condoms costing about $10.99. It is important to note that some condoms cost more than others. The price of each depends on the quality and some peculiarities such as a flavor in condoms intended for oral sex.

People use condoms for two primary reasons i.e. as a birth control method or as a way of protecting themselves against STDs. Sometimes, condoms fail. They may do so because of defectiveness or perhaps the person using it doesn’t know how to use it correctly. For instance, the Chilean government imported 1.2 million defective condoms from China this year. The government realized their defectiveness after distributing 712,000 of them.

The idea of defective condoms is scary for many users. What would these users fear the most? Would they fear an STD more than they fear an unwanted pregnancy or vice versa? Answering this question is only possible if you know why people use condoms in the first place. A recent study published in The Journal of Sex Research sheds light on this. The research team, led by Marie Harvey interviewed 450 young adults aged between 18 and 30 years old. The study revealed that 51% of the young adults used a condom to prevent pregnancy. 17% of them used it to prevent an STD. Finally, 33% of them used it for both disease prevention and birth control.